phoebe journal’s 50th anniversary

It’s exciting to say it—phoebe journal has been celebrating and publishing great literary and artistic work for 50 years now! Submissions are now open through Submittable.

Reading The Lonely City without a Magic Bullet

By Melissa Wade I stare at the rain pouring down from the clogged gutters...

How Do You Know When a Story is Done? How Veteran Writers Assess Their Work

By Kevin Binder The question “Am I done with this story?” is one that...

The World Behind the World: An Interview with Novelist Justin Cronin

By Melissa Wade Justin Cronin, writer of The Passage, no longer writes short...

See More From IWP

In Conversation with Kelli Taylor of The Free Minds Book Club

By Sarah Wilson Recently, I was able to speak with Kelli Taylor, co-founder of...

On Writing Our Way Out: Memoirs from Jail by David Coogan

Reviewed by Sarah Wilson In a time of rejuvenated discourse on racial...

The Incarcerated Writers Project was started by the editors at phoebe as a way to open the publishing platform to writers in prisons across the United States. This population has been traditionally overlooked, undervalued, and pushed to the margins. We believe the inclusion of their literary voices will enlarge and ultimately strengthen the artistic and scholarly community.

From the Archive

Harvest

From Issue 36.1 Danielle Evans Eggs. They wanted eggs, and their requests came...

The Light of the Remotest Stars

From Issue 21.1 Justin Cronin The morning he was scheduled to appear in...

Funerals

Robert Bausch “…Anything makes me laugh, I misbehaved once at a...

Warming

From Issue 39.2 Janann Dawkins The chlorophyll remains in leaf: the limbsretain...

Editor Picks

Landscape Where I Forget My Father

Jennie Malboeuf The four corners of my eyeline are rich with distraction. An...

Monkey Treachery

Larissa Szporluk Maybe I had a baby with my father. Maybe I’m lying. Maybe I...

Rapture

Mary Jo Amani Pay careful attention lest with all the fluctuations of thoughts...

Virginia Is Not Your Home

Jocelyn Johnson They hung that name on you at birth, but Virginia was never...