#ThrowbackThursday

We are excited to announce that Phoebe is beginning the process of digitally archiving past issues and will be posting them here and on Twitter via #ThrowbackThursday. We plan to re-publish work from past print issues once a week to promote the fantastic writing that’s been in our journal over the years and the amazing writers we’ve partnered with in the past. Click the images below to see what we’ve re-published from specific issues, or visit our #ThrowbackThursday blogroll to see our most recent re-publications.

The Stupidest Girl in Fifth Grade

Issue 9.1&2 Fall/Winter 1979 Elizabeth A. Finegan   The mother’s eyes were a smoldering black and fierce like a leopard’s or a tiger’s—and the child darted only the briefest glance at her before quickly lowering her own eyes while she stood clutching her doll, Priscilla, so hard that flakes of cotton stuffing drifted down like…

sparrows on a rooftop in the spring

George Mosby, Jr.   up on the crest of the roof two sparrows dance a mating dance they chirp a while in the early fading mist (light has not long seeped out from darkness) and they enter song then soft and siren as the new scents of wild flowers tuned in the precise same pitch…

(8 a.m.) grassing onions

George Mosby, Jr.   the rows are red and long and dewy green with young grass the boss-guard points to their ends which stretch so far they’re almost out of sight: “you’ve got that distance to hoe before it’s lunch” he says “and then the thing you’ve gotta do is bring another back to here…

the field #11

George Mosby, Jr.   for as far as eyes will reach in every ground direction there are fresh impressions of truck tires like tiny roads in some vast stubby desert they run up and down and around rolling hills barn swallows pluck invisible insects from the air with batlike agility the swiftness in their turns…

March Birthday

Cathy Baker   Now, when rain slaughters the snow, when old cats fish at gutters and we have grown above mud, the wind is at our backs. We sail on the kiteback, We follow the child chasing Its forward foot. Below us is the parent who cannot run for watching. White rags circle behind to…

The Pain between Departure and Return

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George Mosby, Jr.   he visits the old oak tree which he left his heart carved in so many years before it is summer when he returns but his tree carries no leaves and his heart has rotted from in the bark only a trace of the arrow he pierced it with still exists: it’s…
Cover by Dorothy Langdon

The Store

Leslie Woolf Hedley   It was an ordinary store and I saw it every day. Especially in the morning. After office hours I noticed nothing but that bus to rescue me from depressing San Francisco streets. But during early morning moments there’s some abstract appearance of cleanliness, the atmosphere less pathological. There’s an illusion of…

Overarching Genre: An Interview with Stuart Dybek on Writing Fiction and Poetry

Ryan Effgen   Lyricism is a trademark of Stuart Dybek’s writing. The music of his prose and the dreamlike shifts throughout his narratives have his readers frequently describing his stories as poetic. He is the author of two short story collections, Childhood and Other Neighborhoods (1980) and The Coast of Chicago (1990), as well as…

The Last Trick

Issue 6.4 May 1977 Antonis Samarakis (translated by Andrew Horton)   The arrests were made last night. After midnight. That’s only natural: arrests which are intended to be “quality,” the most impressive arrests on record around the world, are made late at night or early in the morning because the trick is to get you…

The Knife

Antonis Samarakis (translated by Andrew Horton)   Thank god he had time to shave. Lately he had often shown up unshaven, and although she said nothing about it and had given no sign that it bothered her, he didn’t wish to appear always to her as if he had just escaped from Devil’s Island. “You…
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